Taste (Morbid, or None)

Bryan Applications, T

The sense of taste depends on stimulation of organs known as the taste buds which are mostly situated in the tongue, though a few are found in the soft palate. To cause this stimulation, a substance must be in solution and the sensation it gives rise to is either sweet, sour, salt, or bitter, or a combination of these. Sweetness …

Tetanus

Bryan Applications, T

Popularly known as lockjaw because, this symptom occurs early in the disease. The cause of the disease is infection with the tetanus bacillus (discovered in the earth by the German physician, Arthur Nicolaier), an organism which is commonly seen with a rounded knob at one end and so is called the drum-stick bacillus. The knob represents a spore, from which …

Thalamus (Brain)

Bryan Applications, T

The large masses of nervous tissue forming the brain have an average weight of forty nine ounces in a male adult. The structure of the brain shows extraordinary complexity. The larger part consists of the cerebrum in the form of two hemispheres, right and left, which are connected together by a broad band of fibers running transversely: and known as …

Thrombophlebitis

Bryan Applications, T

Application and treatment: Begin with standard treatment regimen via water pans, at moderate amplitude settings to reduce symptoms. Proper diagnosis and medical treatment may be essential in the cure, and to help determine if the treatments are working.  

Thrombosis

Bryan Applications, T

Clotting of the blood in the heart or a blood vessel during life is called thrombosis, and the clot that is formed, a thrombus, It should be noted, however, that while the thrombus sometimes consists of the whole blood, and thus resembles an ordinary clot, at other times it is composed mainly of fibrin and occasionally mainly of white cells. …

Thrush (Fungus)

Bryan Applications, T

The growth of a fungus, oidium albicans, on a mucous membrane constitutes thrash. The patches usually occur in the mouth, but may spread to the throat and even to the bowel. In rare instances they have appeared in the vagina. The disorder is most common in children, but debilitated persons of any age may be affected with it. See: Actinomycosis.. …

Thymus (General)

Bryan Applications, T

Behind the upper part of the breast-bone and projecting above it into the root of the neck is a structure called the thymus gland. The base rests upon the pericardium, and behind the gland is the trachea. There are two lobes, a right and a left, but there are no ducts, so that if there is any secretion formed it …

Thyroid

Bryan Applications, T

One of the important group of structures known as the endocrine glands, the thyroid consists of two lobes connected together by a narrow portion called the isthmus. Each lobe is about 2 inches long and lies by the side of the larynx (q.v.) and the upper part of the trachea; the isthmus usually covers the second, third and fourth rings …

Tissue (General, To Stimulate)

Bryan Applications, T

A considerable number of different tissues go to the make-up of the body, but they can all be included in four groups, namely, nervous tissue, muscular tissue, epithelial tissue and connective tissue. Essentially, any tissue consists of cells and an intercellular substance, though the characters and the relative proportions of each of these may vary. Thus, epithelium consists almost entirely …

Tonsillitis

Bryan Applications, T

A mass of lymphoid tissue situated between the pillars of the fauces on either side, the tonsil varies in shape and size in different individuals. It is relatively large in childhood, but in elderly people usually shrinks to very small dimensions. On its surface there are from twelve to fifteen depressions representing the openings into the passages, or crypts that …

Toothache

Bryan Applications, T

A tooth exhibits a crown, a neck and one or more roots or fangs. The roots are composed of dentine, or ivory, and this exists also beneath the crown, surrounding a hollow in the center of the tooth, described as the pulp cavity, which is continued down into the roots. In this cavity is the pulp, consisting of blood vessels, …

Toxic Reaction

Bryan Applications, T

The poisonous substances produced by bacteria are known as toxins. Some of these substances are set free in the blood or any other medium in which the organisms can thrive, while others are contained in the protoplasm of the organisms themselves, but are liberated when the protoplasm is disintegrated. The former are called exotoxins and the latter endotoxins. The tissues …

Trachoma (Eye Inflamed)

Bryan Applications, T

Application and treatment: Infections may cause loss of sight. Infections come from bacteria, virus, worms, and fungi. Infections may be caused by from metals and other objects striking or lodged in the eye areas. Use positive polarity over the eyes at very low output for 10 minutes followed by 5 minutes using negative polarity. Except for the time spent in …

Trauma (Shock, Heart Injury)

Bryan Applications, T

A wound or other injury is sometimes called a trauma. The results of a trauma may be called traumatism, the corresponding adjective being traumatic. Thus, epilepsy due to an injury to the head is called traumatic epilepsy. Fever occurring within thirty-six hours after an injury is called simple traumatic fever and is due presumably to the absorption of damaged tissue …

Tuberculosis

Bryan Applications, T

An infectious disease, characterized by the occurrence of minute rounded bodies known as tubercles, to which circumstance it owes its name, tuberculosis is caused by an organism known as the tubercle bacillus (discovered in 1882 by the German bacteriologist, Robert Koch). In human tuberculosis two types of bacillus are found, the human and the bovine, but other types are found …